click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN2 9
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
CSPAN 5
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 4
MSNBCW 4
KRCB (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBC 2
WETA 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
SFGTV 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
did lose. but for king he interested everything he accomplished with civil-rights was the white house and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go in
conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could think of no better way to celebrate than by paying a visit to coretta scott king at atlanta's iconic e
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights, non-violence organized labor social justice and ending war. today america usually remembers one out of five. i'll start with you tom why is that? >> we all take from dr. king and larger than life figures what we choose to, and sometimes there is an interest involved like avoiding his strong criticism of the vietnam war in 1967, which was very unpopular at the time with some of the black ministers, with the "new york times," with organized labor with much of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civi
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
francisco is the fact that we have always been at the forefront of civil rights and at the forefront of lgbt rights. and there is a place in this world where i hope the city would be open to recognizing the contributions of an openly ldbt person. i would hope that that place would be san francisco. one of the things that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are ta
will lead us in the invocation. >> the farmer chair of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit o
or even cared about civil rights i think it was 14% of african-american voters said that they would be more likely to vote for the republican candidate. >> there are changes in this country that they can no longer deny, and that's why you have people like ralph reed coming out and saying we can't stick our head in the sand anymore, and you have -- there's supposedly winter convention going to have skype training and google hang-outs and -- >> i think google hang-outs sound great and skype training sounds great, but i go back to what pribus said. we have a message that we don't actually have to change our policy, right? if we have enough google hangs we can convince minority voters, gay voters that we're inclusive, and, yet, you have the president delivering a message to the country on monday which was about immigration, gay rights, as civil rights issue, and immigration. none of which should be controversial. >> i don't think he believes they have to change anywhere. i think many are willing to change on immigration. i think you'll find more and more of them changing on gay rights.
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
that really moved justice. lyndon johnson would say maybe that saw like he admitted the first civil rights law was really bad but he said the important thing was to pass it. once you pass it, it's easy to go back and fix it. and i think that if i look back on his first term, i think of two things. one was the healthcare and foreign paul is a maybe because i'm writing right now about a president bringing a country into a war it didn't need. i think in a way president obama is winding down wars. >> rose: that's one of the things in the atmosphere about him. jon meacham, three presidents that you know well now, andrew jackson, thomas jefferson and george bush 41. how do you assess the first term of barack obama. >> i think if president obama had somehow lost in november, he would have a very strong historical hand to play. because the prevention of more economic disaster in 2009 is something that is not fully appreciated in real time by people who are suffering, historian like that kind of thing. you could have an assessment of how he had done and he had done pretty well in doing that. and i thi
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
that kennedy had introduced, that was stalled, really wasn't going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passing. >> thank you very, very much. >> last fall, caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall. and it was clear he's made johnson come alive for many readers. >> do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you're in awe of him because you're constantly saying, look what he's doing now. >> he got excited talkling about johnson's rise to power. but as we turn to the final book he's writing now about johnson's presidency in vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietn
this is a civil rights issue of now, of today, and we need to make it the civil rights issue and really talk about what's involved, the lives that are involved. >> and i just want to make it clear, you're anti-abortion rights, that's right? >> that's correct, yes. >> just to follow-up to that first question about why the poll numbers have risen and the number of people who support abortion rights. during the election, as you know, todd akin, richard mourdock, two men running for federal office said some unwise things perhaps about race and abortion. do you think that kind of hurt your cause? >> oh, i'm sure it did, and we had -- those clips were run over and over and over and over again and there's no way that that did not affect public opinion. it's unfortunate. i think both of those candidates have very good pro life voting records. what they said was simply unfortunate. they clearly did not know how to communicate what it is that they believe and why they believe it and i think that it became a huge liability for them costing them both of their races. >> now the other side would say, you know,
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)